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As of September, 1989, all 24 of the state’s regional planning commissions had submitted plans for their regional systems. By January 1990, the Advisory Commission on State Emergency Communications (ACSEC), established under House Bill 9-111, had reviewed and approved the plans, thereby authorizing the collection of revenue for 9-1-1 throughout the state. Statewide implementation is imminent as we move into the new millenium.

District staff interfaces with telephone companies on a regular basis, on fee collections and reports, database, 9-1-1 service features, public education, and other pertinent issues regarding E9-1-1 service.

The District also studies the tariffs which the telephone companies file with the Public Utility Commission, to determine if or how a certain tariff may affect 9-1-1 service. The   9-1-1 service within our District is funded by a 9-1-1 service fee assessed on all local exchange access lines, including wireless (cellular) phones. These fees are transmitted to the District and are used to fund the 9-1-1 system. In those areas which are participating jurisdictions of the District, the Board of Managers sets the fee level each year as a part of the fiscal year budget approval.


The History of 9-1-1